Kidney Cancer

James Hsieh, MD, PhD (left), R. Sherburne Figenshau, MD (center), and Eric Kim, MD (right) discuss research in Dr. Hsieh's lab. James Hsieh, MD, PhD (left), R. Sherburne Figenshau, MD (center), and Eric Kim, MD (right) discuss research in Dr. Hsieh's lab.

Our team of urologic surgeons sees on average 350 cases of kidney cancer a year, and performed the world’s first kidney removal using minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. Compared to traditional surgery, laparoscopic surgery requires only three or four small punctures, instead of a large incision. This approach substantially reduces the pain and discomfort of patients and hastens recovery.

Siteman also offers non-surgical treatment for kidney cancer, especially for patients ineligible for any type of surgery due to their poor health or age. This group of patients may receive percutaneous cryoablation, a procedure that involves inserting probes through the skin to freeze small tumors in the kidney. This procedure currently is appropriate only for small tumors or for patients who have no other alternatives. Because this technique holds the promise for being the least debilitating of all kidney cancer treatments, researchers are focused on expanding its application for the future.

Our approach

Patients who come to the Siteman Cancer Center for treatment of kidney cancer are seen by a team of Washington University Physicians — surgical, medical and radiation oncologists — often during the same visit.

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Symptoms, risk and diagnosis

Learn the symptoms patients with kidney cancer often experience, as well as your risk for kidney cancer.

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Treatments

There are different types of treatment for patients with kidney cancer, depending on the stage of the cancer and the person’s overall health.

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